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Wild Swimming Activities, Barefoot Campsites, Appleford

Fancy a dip?

Lots of fun for everyone

Wild Swimming at Barefoot Campsites, Appleton

On a summer’s day, the refreshing waters of the River Thames at Barefoot Campsites can be enjoyed by young and old alike.

If you haven’t tried river swimming before – why not take a look at the Wild Swimming website – their ‘Wild Swimming Magazine’ menu tab has some great ideas, advice and suggestions on how to get started.

Wild Swimming

Wild Swimming CodeWeil's Disease

Wild Swimming Code

River swimming can be very enjoyable but there are some dangers you should be aware of opening times Barefoot Camping, Appleford

                    • Remember, DO NOT SWIM in the weir pool or near the entrances to the lock.
                    • In the Upper Lock Paddock, swim only upstream of the swimming steps (away from the lock). On no account swim towards the lock or the steps on the lock lay by.
                    • Keep a safe distance away from other river users, in particular larger, motorised vessels. This is especially important near the campsite as they will be concentrating on entering or leaving the lock
                    • Keep cuts and wounds covered with waterproof plasters.
                    • Avoid contact with blue–green algae or getting tangled in the reeds at the side of the river.
                    • Never swim alone and keep a constant watch on weak swimmers.
                    • Never jump into water you have not thoroughly checked for depth and obstructions.
                    • Always make sure you know how you will get out before you get in.
                    • Don’t get too cold – warm up with exercise and warm clothes before and after a swim.
                    • Wear footwear if you can.
                    •  
                      Before you visit, we recommend you read the safety recommendations for river swimming found on the Wild Swimming Website.

                       

                      Weil’s Disease:

                      The risk of contracting Weil’s disease is slight but it is a serious condition and we want you to be fully informed.

                      As you may know, rats pee as they run. Rat urine is a source of Weil’s disease. Weil’s disease causes kidney damage and is potentially fatal. It is primarily a disease of river banks and farmyards, not river water or river mud as many believe – rats live on land!

                      How to protect yourself:

                      * Always wash your hands thoroughly before you eat or drink.
                      * Immediately clean and cover grazes and cuts, even small ones.
                      * Keep your head (eyes, nose and throat) out of the water as much as possible.

                      If you or a member of your group develop flu like symptoms within about three weeks of the event (the incubation period can be a lot shorter), they should be taken to the doctor immediately for diagnosis. Inform the doctor that you have been involved in river activity. Symptoms include high fever, chills, joint pain, muscle pain (esp in the calves, oddly), headaches (sometimes with light-aversion), nausea, cough, loss of appetite. It’s very unlikely but needs to be watched for.

                      If you follow sensible hygiene as outlined above then the risk is low.
                      See more at: ‘Wild Swimming Safety (Freshwater)’
                       

Weil’s Disease:

The risk of contracting Weil’s disease is slight but it is a serious condition and we want you to be fully informed.

As you may know, rats pee as they run. Rat urine is a source of Weil’s disease. Weil’s disease causes kidney damage and is potentially fatal. It is primarily a disease of river banks and farmyards, not river water or river mud as many believe – rats live on land!

How to protect yourself:

* Always wash your hands thoroughly before you eat or drink.
* Immediately clean and cover grazes and cuts, even small ones.
* Keep your head (eyes, nose and throat) out of the water as much as possible.

If you or a member of your group develop flu like symptoms within about three weeks of the event (the incubation period can be a lot shorter), they should be taken to the doctor immediately for diagnosis. Inform the doctor that you have been involved in river activity. Symptoms include high fever, chills, joint pain, muscle pain (esp in the calves, oddly), headaches (sometimes with light-aversion), nausea, cough, loss of appetite. It’s very unlikely but needs to be watched for.

If you follow sensible hygiene as outlined above then the risk is low.
See more at: ‘Wild Swimming Safety (Freshwater)’

 

David Walliams,

Day 2, Northmoor Lock, September 2011.

Campsite, Appleford

David Walliams warming up with his trainer at the start of day 2 of his marathon swim of the River Thames from Lechlade to London in 2011 for Comic Relief.

 

Quality Checked

River Quality MapBiology & ChemistryNitrates & Phosphates

River Quality Map:

Check out the Environment Agency ‘River Quality map’ (you may need to re-enter the postcode OX13 5JP)
You’ll see the Weir at Northmoor Lock, click the ‘-‘ sign once to reveal the 2 river quality sampling points at Newbridge (west and upstream) and Bablockhythe (north and downstream) of Northmoor Lock Paddocks.

        • Newbridge (upstream)
        • Bablockhythe (downstream)

Take a look at a summary of the most recent reported results (2009) for biology & chemistry, nitrates & phosphates

A is the best, F the worst.

You should not swim in a river with a Biological or Chemical rating of D, E or F.

You should exercise caution in a river of level C by covering cuts with a plaster and trying to keep your head above water.

Newbridge (Upstream) Report

        • Chemistry: A
        • Biology: B

Bablockhythe (Downstream) Report

        • Chemistry: B
        • Biology: (not reported)

A and B are good or very good water quality rivers – enjoy!

Nitrates and Phosphates are not poisonous but they can make the river green.
1 is the best, 6 the worst.

Newbridge (Upstream) Report

        • Nitrates: 5
        • Phosphates: 3

Bablockhythe (Downstream) Report

        • Nitrates: 4
        • Phosphates: 4